November Garden Report

vegetable garden big beetJust as I did for June, July, August, September and October, it’s time for another garden update.

As you might expect, it is pretty much over for a garden in the Northeast by November.  But a few stragglers keep coming:

  • Tomatoes.  I can’t believe we *still* have cherry tomatoes.  They don’t taste as good as the August/September versions, but they keep growing against the odds. We have a freezer full of them.
  • Beets. We planted a second batch of beets in September.  They didn’t grow as big as the first round, but I like to eat the beet greens.
  • Carrots. My kid loves pulling carrots.
  • Beans.  A few green  beans, again from a second “crop” planting.
  • Herbs.  Rosemary and Sage are still going strong.

Really not much gardening to do these days. but we are thinking about what worked and what did not for future reference.

What Worked:

  • Tomatoes.  All the tomatoes: Brandywine, Sungold, Green Zebra, Heirloom Romas.  I developed some serious tomato-canning skills this year.  We intermix them with marigold, nasturtium and herbs, which seems to produce results.
  • Zucchini (and Yellow Squash).  They were good and there were lots of them.
  • Arugula, Lettuce and Spinach.  I think we figured out the magic recipe this year.  Plant early (like March), then cover to keep them warm and bug free.
  • Snow Peas.  A success; also early in the year.
  • Pumpkins. We had four big pumpkins.
  • Beets. I ate more beets this year than in the rest of my life combined.

What Did Not:

  • Cucumbers.  I want to make pickles.  This is the third year we have tried to grow cucumbers (in different spots) and they just aren’t happening.
  • Green Beans.  Although they were “okay”, there was about 1/2 the yield as last year.  A hot spell early in the summer and some kind of pest issue did a lot of damage.  We may try moving them to another spot.
  • Bell Pepper.  Maybe it just doesn’t get hot enough here?  One lowly pepper wasn’t worth the space dedicated to it.
  • Cantaloupe and Watermelon.  Just don’t work; probably not hot enough here.
  • Cauliflower, Broccoli and Brussel Sprouts were devastated by moths.

That’s it for now.  I’m not sure if it will be worth another report for December – February.  If any serious gardeners have cucumber advice, let me know!

 

About Sara Stanich

Sara Stanich, CFP®, CDFA™, works with people who are building their lives – growing a business, raising a family, moving toward personal achievements – to help them build solid financial plans for the future. Have a financial question? CLICK HERE TO ASK SARA!

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